11 June 2008 @ 05:30 pm
Ceiling Fan Circulation  
Hi Folks!

Do any of you know the correct direction for ceiling fan circulation for both the hot and cold seasons? I can't seem to remember!


Thanks in advance.
 
 
( 20 comments — Leave a comment )
Anna Marieannie22 on June 11th, 2008 09:43 pm (UTC)
Blowing air down in the summer and up in the winter. The easiest way is to try it both ways and stand under it to see which direction it's blowing. Good luck! :)
Anna Marieannie22 on June 11th, 2008 09:54 pm (UTC)
......X
....X..
..X.... -----> in the summer
X......

X......
..X....
....X.. -----> in the winter
......X

The Xs are looking at the fan blade from its end, and the arrows are what direction they're moving. Does this make any sense? :) My brain is fried from a long day of studying!
Miss Courtneycourtneydisney on June 11th, 2008 09:44 pm (UTC)
I read this as a Ceiling Cat question. ~sigh~ I need to get off LJ.

I'm curious as well about the answer.
Caro: Snarkcarosconundrum on June 11th, 2008 10:53 pm (UTC)
I was thinking that she should just ask Ceiling Cat.

What does recycle cat say?
Cassiejovial_kitten on June 12th, 2008 01:19 am (UTC)
Just don't ask Ceiling Fan Cat,he's still recuperating from motion sickness.
Her name was Nyamé & the name of her name was Nod.voicesinherbody on June 11th, 2008 09:57 pm (UTC)
I am presuming all fan blades tilt in the same direction, so...

Counterclockwise in the summer, clockwise in the winter.
stillthefaireststillthefairest on June 11th, 2008 10:50 pm (UTC)
mine's the opposite..it all depends on the direction the blad is going in in the first place.
stillthefaireststillthefairest on June 11th, 2008 10:51 pm (UTC)
blade rather
rineyriney on June 11th, 2008 10:42 pm (UTC)
Our fan is currently going clockwise.
stillthefaireststillthefairest on June 11th, 2008 10:52 pm (UTC)
mine goes clockwise, but it all depends on the direction of the blade in the first place...basically have it go one way and stand underneath it. If you feel the breeze coming down that's the right way. To be sure, have it go the other way and see if it feels any different.
Old Narnian: Mamabug the Domesticdoorinward on June 12th, 2008 12:50 am (UTC)
Down if you want to feel air on you, up if you don't. It honestly makes no difference seasonally to do one vs. the other--this is one of those silly wive's tales that won't die. ;)
Maggiemaggie226 on June 12th, 2008 01:44 am (UTC)
Actually, it can make QUITE a difference. Here in FL, my mom's A/C isn't working and if her fans are going the wrong direction, the feeble AC has to work overtime and completely shuts down. If the fans are going in the right direction, she can maintain a moderate amount of cool from it.
Old Narniandoorinward on June 12th, 2008 02:19 am (UTC)
I didn't suggest that blowing air downward doesn't help to cool a room. I only meant that there is no reason to switch the blades a particular way in the winter vs the summer--the real question is where you want the air to blow and whether you want to cool a room.
tingakitty on June 12th, 2008 02:24 am (UTC)
I would say that there is a reason to switch the rotation direction of the blades. If in the summer you wish to cool a room, thus the reason I started this post. Also, in the winter I sure would not want to cool a room, again switching the blade direction accordingly

Anyway, thanks all for the good feedback! Now to go around and change the switches :)
Old Narniandoorinward on June 12th, 2008 02:31 am (UTC)
Some of us use our ceiling fans to cool a room year round (esp. on the second floor), so this is not so much a "no brainer" as you might think. Reversal of blades is of very slim benefit. Makes the ceiling dusty (and probably not worth the electricity). Just my 2 cents.
tingakitty on June 12th, 2008 02:38 am (UTC)
Thanks for your input, but it would have been easier if it was more clear in your first reply that for those that wish to cool their rooms year round, there is no reason to reverse the blade rotation.

My original request for feedback clearly stated a difference in temperature from one season to another;

"Do any of you know the correct direction for ceiling fan circulation for both the hot and cold seasons? I can't seem to remember!"

Those of us that have cold seasons probably don't want cold air blowing down on us unlike those that live in regions like yours that would care for cool air all year to be blown down.

Then you said:

"It honestly makes no difference seasonally to do one vs. the other"

It was just misleading or confusing, I don't know.

Anyway, I switched the direction of some of my fans and can already feel a difference.



Edited at 2008-06-12 02:38 am (UTC)
Old Narnian: Mamabug the Domesticdoorinward on June 12th, 2008 02:53 am (UTC)
ahh I see where you might have been confused. That's what I get for replying half asleep I suppose. There are people who swear on a jar of skippy that blowing air up in winter helps keep a room warmer such that the furnace doesn't have to work so hard and thus they will reverse the blades in every room twice a year regardless of whether they want to cool the room, which is the real question.

Fwiw, I don't live in a hot region either ;) I just have a three+ story home and heat rises so I do, in fact cool certain rooms in winter when there are subzero temperatures and snow on the ground.

Edited at 2008-06-12 02:56 am (UTC)
tingakitty on June 12th, 2008 01:49 pm (UTC)
hahaha, half asleep typing!
njlorelei: grapesnjlorelei on June 12th, 2008 02:48 am (UTC)
The ceiling fans we installed ourselves specifically said in the instructions which way to have it go for winter vs. summer. One makes the air flow up and the other down. It makes sense. I don't think it's a silly wive's tale.
Old Narnian: The perils of keeping an open minddoorinward on June 12th, 2008 03:10 am (UTC)
...so in other words,

blow the air downward if you want to feel air on you, up if you don't...sounds familiar.

The wive's tale part is that there is some specific direction to run a fan in winter vs. summer regardless of whether you want to cool a room. There is no "winter direction" or "summer direction." Rather, there is a "cool the room" direction and a "run it just to hear the hum and provide a slight circulation of air direction."

( 20 comments — Leave a comment )